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with all this speculation, you know, that this is a tax haven and that this is money that people have questions about, that the way europe is approaching sigh pruls is not the way you'd awe approach these other countries and if you approach the other countries this way you create a real problem and they know that. >> that brings what happens to the parliament and what impact does that have. >> the cyprian parliament decide the to vote down the bill to confiscate the money from depositors. we don't have a bill or any certainty what's going to happen. most likely recommit to the cyprian parliament and then see what's going to happen to the banks. remember the banks have been closed until thursday morning. today walt the governor of the central bank of cyprus presumely he will know saying it could be a run of ten percent of deposits on the cyprian banks. and that's cause for concern. i think the banks in cyprus make two fundamental mistakes. banking 101 is supposed to boil out. don't lose money you don't have and they did and don't ever mess with deposits because that really does effect
in the banking sector and with higher taxes, the cypriot economy could shrink by 10%. with years of hardship. and that is the big unknown. will the rescue end uncertainty or will cyprus end up like some of the other bailed out countries, with a lost generation, facing recession and job losses? >> pretty grim prospects in cyprus. and in a speech to the cypriot people tonight, the president called the deal painful but he said it was the best he could get. for more on the reaction there, i spoke to the bb's tim wilcox. we have now some clarity on the deal that cyprus has struck with europe. does it look like the island's actually going to be worse off because of this? >> it's instinct because i've just been talking to one of the m.p.'s who voted against the proposals last week, which was going to have a 10% levy or hair cut on deposits over 100,000 euros and 6.7% for those under, and she admitted today for the first time, because she hasn't on previous occasions, that probably people would be worse off and that is because of the fundamental damage that this -- the bailout deal is going to do to
anger. the deal includes a heavy tax on bank deposits. savers queued for hours to try to get their money out. now the government says all banks will be closed till thursday as it negotiates the terms of this deal. gavin hewitt starts our coverage. >> hurt, anger, outrage -- that was the mood on the streets of the cypriot capital. in exchange for european bailout, small and large savers will have to pay a one-off tax. >> we are sleeping. we all come in the morning, knowing that we were significant -- >> as a nation, it has taken us 40 years to build our economy to the level it is. with done one day -- within one day, we have shot it down. we are very betrayed. >> they can do it anywhere. live in europe, europe has betrayed us. >> at one stage, the crowd was urged to march towards the presidential palace. many people believed their savings had been guaranteed. what is clear is that the bailout deal negotiated in brussels cannot be implemented here except in the face of furious opposition. will have depositors to pay -- just reducing the amounts savers and depositors will have to pay probab
-term spending cuts continues. >> republicans and democrats in washington are still fighting over taxes and spending but they've agreed to keep the fight under control. house already passed a bill to keep the government running past the end of this month. now the senate is preparing to do the same thing and there, the two parties aren't far apart on the details. >> we've con ens didded the number of amendments being talked about seriously. i commend them and their staff through all of their efforts. >> i spoke with them this morning. they've yet to reach an agreement. >> but the gap remains huge for a long-term plan for bringing government spending and revenue inline. >> they'll reduce the entitlement programs but only if republicans agree to tax hikes and jepd speaker john boehner said the house's answer to that is no. >> the president got his tax heights on january 1st. the talk about raising revenue is over. it's time to deal with the spending problem. >> the two chambers have a way of talking about their differences, not with president obama but on each other. work on the contrastin
.d.p. which is what they're now perhaps going to get. by taxing depositors, they actually have the ability to also tax nonresidents, as we saw in your clip just now. there's a lot of british there but there are even more russian depositors so in that sense you actually end up having the ability to bring in tax revenue from non-cyprusians. that's a big advantage for the government of cyprus because this is money that otherwise they would have had to raise by cutting pensions or other types of austerity measures. >> woodruff: the russians and others stand to be hurt pretty badly by this. >> basically that's part of the strategy or the intent of both the euro area, the i.m.f. and the cyprusian government. >> woodruff: but the signal that sends, i mean, what's the message it sends to the rest of europe? i mean, how worried should they be that what's going on in cyprus and we don't know how this is going to play out because the banks are closed for the next few days. how worried should the rest of the banks in europe be? >> i don't think there's an immediate risk of sort of contagious bank run
not on a sustainable fiscal path because of the tax cuts because of the unpaid four wars because of demographics. so we need to do two things at once. we need to support the economy in the short run, investorring in infrastructure putting construction workers back to work, making america important competitive in the future and also address the problems causing a long-run deficit which are healthcare rapidly growing healthcare costs. we can improve our tax code by closing all the tax loopholes that we have. that's what the president has been focused on since frankly since i started working for him back in 09. >> rose: do you believe, are you hopeful that somehow the capitol, the dinners the lunches that are taking place that there's somehow a change in the dynamic of the conversation? >> i think the president is willing to try whatever will work. i think that it's a pretty high hurdle he's facing. i say that because the president worked awfully hard because of the congressional leadership to reach a grand bargain. we set as a goal as a number of others have to rules the deficit by 4 trillion dollars ov
-year spending plan written by democrats. they call for higher taxes to fund government programs. house speaker john boehner remained skeptical. >> the budget that senate democrats are considering never balances, ever. that means more debt, fewer jobs and, frankly, much higher taxes from the american people. >> sreenivasan: the negotiations over these competing party visions for governing will begin in earnest when president obama submits his spending blueprint on april 8. with their work done, house members leave town today for a two week recess. while senators will remain in a marathon session until a vote on their own plan to fund the government. judy woodruff takes it from there. >> woodruff: for what's happening behind-the-scenes, we turn to todd zwillich, washington correspondent for "the takeaway" on public radio international. welcome back to the newshour. >> good to be with you, judy. >> woodruff: first this vote to keep the government funded by the end of the fiscal year, both the house and senate passed this. does this mean democrats and republicans finally see eye to eye on somethin
and there might still be a tax on savings. it was rejected once but might be applied to big deposits. every move is controversial. these bank statue were blocking the roads today. they fear restructuring the banks will lead to layoffs. >> they fear they won't have a job. what do you think will happen? >> whatever is decided here will still have to win the approval of the eurozone and the i.m.f. in order for cyprus to receive a bailout. >> and the reports coming in tonight do suggest that as part of the new plan being debited by the cypriot pafrlment, it has agreed to create that pool for sate assets and giving the government more control on banks. i spoke with mark lowe. >> this looks from the outside a real mess. is it? >> a huge mess and few would have expected that the third smallest economy in the eurozone could have the messiest bailout of awful. a lot of eyes across europe will be on sip russ as m.p.'s are looking to rode vote on the much-talked about plan b. the vital rescue funds will be turned off monday. if that happens, cyprus could be forced to drop out of the europeo. a lot of unpre
gas. the parliament of cyprus voted to reject a bill that would tax bank deposits in order to qualify for an international bailout package. to receive $13 billion from the e.u. and the international monetary fund, cyprus has to raise $7.5 billion on its own. but taxing people's bank accounts proved unpopular, even when the provision was added to shield small savers. banks across cyprus will remain closed until thursday to avoid a run on cash. uncertainty about the cyprus situation set markets around the world and on wall street on edge. the dow jones industrial average gained more than three points to close above 14,455. the nasdaq fell eight points to close at 3229. seven u.s. marines were killed after a mortar unexpectedly exploded during a training exercise in western nevada. military officials said that prompted the pentagon to halt the use of the mortar worldwide until an investigation can be completed. the accident happened last night at the hawthorne army depot. the marines who were killed were based at camp lejeune in north carolina. seven other marines and sailors were injure
is that states and locates almost inevitability have to cut back when time is tough. they lose tax revenues. they are mandated legally to run a balanced budget so at the time same time consumers and red soxes pull back the government is. in washington, starting in 2011, with the negotiations between the house republicans and the white houses, the house republicans have insisted on big cuts and have won big cuts and that's why we have austerity and will have more this year. >> rose: if the fed wanted to reduce unemployment from seven to whatever it is-- seven. could they do that? do they have the tools to do that? >> no. i don't think so. they're down to incremental policies. i think they know that. ben bernanke and janet yellen, and otheres, are constantly arguing-- correct, i think-- but they tend to put the best face on it as they can, we still have effective policy instruments, we can still give the economy a boost. but you're talking in the desmalplace of the growth rate. there is nothing left in the fed's arsenal, i don't think that could as a half a point to the growth rate. that's no
that advertised discretion and what they call tax optimization. and they did have lower corporate tax rates. so there are legitimate reasons to put your money here. but, also, previous governments than the current one, they wanted to be a international financial center. they worked very hard to attract capital from all over the world. it is the business model of this country. but it's not going to be very for long. they just can't do it anymore. >>> one statistic to leave you with. the banking system is so much larger here in cyprus, if we wanted to have one in the united states that was as large equivalent to our economy, we would need 45 more jpmorgans. that's how much bigger we would have to get to match the size that they've done here relative to the size of this place. >> thank you very much. >>> well, a big bipartisan vote at the capital, the senate overwhelmingly passed a massive stop-gap spending bill that will keep washington up and running through the end of september. it leaves federal spending cuts in place. but that could mean job furloughs for hundreds of thousands of federal work
off that tax. i spoke a short time ago with former u.s. treasury secretary tim -- larry suckers -- i spoke a short time ago with former u.s. treasury secretary larry summers. >> it changed the world. sarah gave a was a small place -- sarajevo was a small place. it matters so much because of theexample that may be in process of being set. it has heretofore been assumed that insured deposits of ordinary citizens are as good a credit as exists in these countries. the apparent decision that is not the case, with the endorsement of the european authorities, with the endorsement of the imf, calls that into question. there is little wonder that markets are experiencing a change in the way the world that, and it is change they find unsettling. >> if you are a middle aged retiree in italy or spain today, are you really looking at what is happening in cyprus and thinking, you know what, i might take my savings out of the bank as well? is that the problem? >> certainly a sense of complete confidence that people have that other people have is attenuated by an action of this kind. inis very impor
are there, but nobody heeded them. this has long been a tax haven, a country whose banking sector is eight times the size of the economy. cyprus new what was happening in did not take action. now it is a country that is in severe crisis, and it could really set off a chain reaction across the eurozone. that said, it would be unlikely that the eurozone would let them drop out or a bailout that pales in comparison to the rest, but there will have to be a radical the calculus -- the calculation to try to stabilize the entire single currency -- a radical recalculation to try to stabilize the entire single currency. >> thank you. if you thought the euro crisis was over, it may be time to think again. let's go to syria where there is a confused picture over a potentially dangerous development tonight. the syrian government and rebels are accusing each other of launching a deadly chemical attack near the northern city of aleppo. state news claims that 25 people were killed by a rocket containing poisonous gases. the rebels denied the allegation. they are blaming the assad regime. russia supports
a one-off tax. now have to come up with the money some other way. gavin hewitt has the latest. >> there is anger and anxiety in cyprus. this was a crowd of bank workers blocking access, and arriving mps had to be lifted over police barricades. protesters fear their bank will collapse. were shaken. why did they shout at you? >> because they're losing money. linesing the day, long had formed at the cash machines as the government's scramble to raise billions of euros to avoid bankruptcy. the lines mainly focused on one bank, rumored to be in difficulty. >> there is a rumor that if somebody does not buy it, it will close. >> at 1 cash machine, they posted the time when there would be funds. people phone friends to tell the one security bands were making cash deliveries -- when the security fans were making cash deliveries. with the bank still closed, some of the petrol stations were insisting on cash payments only. >> i am taking cash only because my company, have to pay them cash. suppliers later, a called. insisting on 40,000 euros, in cash, to make the next delivery. the earli
-sex marriage that is recognized by the state. in terms of estate tax and benefits, some 1,000 programs. if a couple is legally married in the eyes of its is state, it is not married in the eyes of the federal government. that is a new policy for the federal government. prop 8 only speaks to california and bans same-sex marriage in california. >> scott: vik, they are different, but intersect. we will learn about what the justices feel about doma on tuesday when they ask questions about prop 8. what are the legal even tantangs here? >> jane is correct. the supreme court could strike one down without affecting the other. their way is to do that. both at the procedural level and substantive lae substantive level, there are comm commonalities. how do we defend a statute, the president and attorney general and governor, decline to defend? in both of these, the elected executive officials declined. that is a common question. on marriage, at base, the cases ask a fundamental question of protection under the 14th amendment. how skeptical should the court be on the laws that discrimination on se
washington has taken away by tax increases and sequestration it is a small episode. >> let's dig deeper. do you think that the level of profit growth will not justify any real further expansion of the price earnings multiple or what? >> i would say the first part, yes. if you look at profits they are very, very strong and have been for a while but it is a maturing earnings cycle. also in this environment the u.s. economy is growing more like 2% and a lot less like 4 in that environment pricing is going to be challenged and the top line sales is not going to be universal for all firms. it will be balance sheet by balance sheet and case by case. security collection becomes far more important. >> i was going to say as you point out the profit growth picture has been pretty good but we are getting at the mature point in that cycle and the forecast is about 1% or 2% overall growth. there are always ways to make more money than the index tracking would lead you to believe. where do you think the pockets of possible better than average profits would be? >> so we do like equities. when you compare
in congress especially in the senate. they did rise above a lot of the special interests with tax reform and fixing the social security system. they managed to survive re-election. if you take principled positions, stand up for them, explain them to your constituents, you know, maybe they'll raise more money by refusing the wall street guys and going to the main street constituents who vote for them. i think at the end of the day they'll sleep better at night t too. >> that's all the more reason to read "bull by the horns." sheila bear, thank you very much for what you're doing and for being with me today. >> thanks for having me. ♪ >>> it's not only our banking system that remains questionable and shaky, it's the whole of our economy, that complex mix master of capital and labor, prices and production, goods and services, rewards and punishments, largely driven by private decisions in what has been defined, mythologically, as "the free market." capitalism t, it turns out, is a capital idea if you have the capital. which brings us back to richard wolf. i say "back" because as many of y
will be shut down. the parliament rejected an earlier plan to tax all bank deposits large and small. but this new agreement sparked little optimism in nicosia, the capital. >> the decisions that were taken were harsh. it is a catastrophe. it will be a long time before things are right again. >> it's a big shame what has happened with the way things were going, what else could they do? there was no other solution. god help us all. >> warner: the bailout does prevent cyprus from falling out of the euro currency system. a prospect that alarmed financial markets last week. still, the cyprusite foreign minister don't sound relieved. >> we feel rather bitter. we feel rather that we have not been treated the same way as other partners. probably being the smallest, i don't know. but we are a resilient people. we are going to fight. >> warner: the nuzzles got a chilly reception in russia where depositors hold an estimated $26 billion in cyprus banks but in germany chancellor angela merkel praised the deal. >> i am very pleased that a solution was found last night. i believe that a fair burde
not to be too strong in the second quarter. let's remember what just happened. the payroll tax going away, the sequester that's really going to start hitting in april. therefore the second quarter. so earnings in the short term might seem weak, but we do believe over the next couple years, the earnings story could be strong, especially when you look at the economy and the fundamental story what's happening with housing and slowly what's happening to jobs. >> so where should i put my money, andress? if i want to be a broadly diversified global investor, what percentage of it right now of my equity holdings should be in the u.s. market and what percentage in foreign markets, what percentage in emerging markets? >> so first off, we are overweight in the u.s. equity markets over, for instance, other developed economies like europe. i think a lot of the headline risk is going to actually send a lot of dollars back into the united states. and fundamentally, the u.s. economic story is improving. but just a comment on emerging markets. you hit on something that i think is important. i think most
bailout. yesterday, the cypriot parliament rejected a bill to tax bank deposits. today, lawmakers crafted a plan "b." we have a report from jonathan rugman of "independent television news." >> reporter: why would the finance minister of a sun-kissedile be braving moscow's weather? because he's desperate for money. he came begging for around $5 billion euros and doesn't intend to leave without it. >> there were no offers, nothing concrete. we are continuing discussion. we are happy with a good beginning and looking forward to continuing this discussion over the next few hours. >> and while the cypriots have flown to russia, the russians have flown to cyprus. in a country where cash points still work, even if the banks behind them don't. these banks are not set to reopen until next tuesday. any dash for cash, and they could collapse. >> cyprus is facing on the economic side a question of survival. >> reporter: even the orthodox church has joined the scramble for a solution. the island's archbishop today told the president he would put the church's vast property portfolio up as collateral. y
budget bill would impose almost $1 trillion of tax increases couplihu)ud $875 billion in spending cuts. democrat chris coons of delaware said crafting a budget should be about more than the bottom line. >> we need to do it in a way that both stabilizes our deficit and debt, makes critical investments in growing our economy and preserves the core of the programs on which americans rely. this is not just about numbers. it is also about values. it is also about priorities. >> sreenivasan: republican jeff sessions of alabamaçó called democrats out for how they were using the word balance during the debate. >> they're also using the word balance. they hope people will hear it and think that this means they have a balanced budget. they know they don't have a balanced budget. they won't tell the american people they don't have one. they just use the word. but it's not in their document. >> sreenivasan: sessions forced a vote on an amendment to put democrats on record in opposition to balancing the budget by the end of the decade. it failed on a near-party line vote. lawmakers in north dakot
Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)